Color/Appearance

The heartwood is a light brown color, though darker shades can also be seen, which is sometimes sold as Olive Ash.

Grain/Texture

Has a medium to coarse texture similar to oak. The grain is almost always straight and regular, though sometimes curly or figured boards can be found.

Endgrain

Ring-porous; large earlywood pores 2-4 rows wide, small latewood pores solitary and radial multiples of 2-3; tyloses common; growth rings distinct; rays barely visible without lens; parenchyma banded (marginal), paratracheal parenchyma around latewood pores vasicentric, aliform, and confluent.

Rot Resistance

Heartwood is rated as perishable, or only slightly durable in regard to decay. Ash is also not resistant to insect attack.

Workability

Produces good results with hand or machine tools. Responds well to steam bending. Glues, stains, and finishes well.

Allergies/Toxicity

Ash in the Fraxinus genus has been reported to cause skin irritation, and a decrease in lung function. See the articles Wood Allergies and Toxicity and Wood Dust Safety for more information.

Pricing/Availability

European Ash is the European equivalent to White Ash of the United States, and both should be among the least expensive utility hardwoods available domestically, respectively. It should compare similarly to oak in terms of price.

Sustainability

This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses

Flooring, millwork, boxes/crates, baseball bats, and other turned objects such as tool handles.
Comments: European Ash has fairly good strength properties for its weight, and is also shock resistant.

Example